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This tax season, the Internal Revenue Service and state revenue departments are bracing for fraudulent refund requests filed by identity thieves.  Read more about steps the IRS is taking here.  This scam not only defrauds the U.S. Treasury, but can cause innocent taxpayers major headaches.  Your good credit is a valuable asset.  You can help protect it by taking action:

  1. If you file your returns this year and find that a fraudulent return has already been filed, immediately report the matter to the IRS or your state revenue department.
  2. If you use TurboTax to file your returns, log into your account and make sure a return hasn’t been fraudulently filed.  If you find evidence of fraud, contact TurboTax customer service immediately.
  3. Request a taxpayer-specific PIN from the IRS by filing IRS Form 14039.  Visit this link for a copy of the form:  https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f14039.pdf
  4. Consider placing a fraud alert or freeze on your file with the major credit bureaus.
  5. Monitor your own credit by obtaining a free copy of your credit report from each of the major credit bureaus annually.

No hope of a refund?  Certain tax debts may be dischargeable in bankruptcy.  If you feel overwhelmed by what you owe, call our office for a free consultation, and see how we can help.

Scammers are reportedly posing as bankruptcy attorneys and asking their intended victims for wire transfers to satisfy a debt. Your bankruptcy attorney will never ask for a wire transfer to pay a debt. If you receive a call like this, hang up immediately and contact your attorney’s office as soon as possible. Read more here.

Many people wonder how a celebrity like 50 Cent is eligible to file bankruptcy. You might ask, “Where did all his money go?” Well, the Bankruptcy Code (the set of laws governing bankruptcy proceedings) doesn’t require a person seeking bankruptcy protection to be insolvent. In fact, there are two main types of bankruptcy proceedings: liquidations and reorganizations. Individuals who need bankruptcy protection have several chapters available to them: Chapter 7, Chapter 13, and Chapter 11. Farmers have their own type of bankruptcy proceeding under Chapter 12. The appropriate type of proceeding for an individual will depend on their particular situation. A bankruptcy attorney can advise you about the appropriate course of action in your case.

You can read about other bankrupt celebrities here.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 18, 2014

RALEIGH – United States Attorney Thomas G. Walker announced that today in federal court, Chief United States District Judge James C. Dever III sentenced DONALD Wayne MANGUM , 52, of Fuquay-Varina to 24 months imprisonment, followed by 3 years of supervised release, and ordered him to pay $101,675.00 in restitution.

MANGUM was named in an Indictment filed on October 24, 2013, charging him with Bankruptcy Fraud and Destruction, Alteration, and Falsification of Records. On December 16, 2013, MANGUM pled guilty to those charges.

According to the investigation, on February 28, 2011,  MANGUM fraudulently filed a Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition in the Eastern District of North Carolina, in the name of someone else in an effort to prevent the mortgage holder from foreclosing on his home. MANGUM failed to file a schedule of assets and liabilities or statement of financial affairs.  The debt counseling statements, which were fraudulently filed under the penalty of perjury by MANGUM, were signed in the name of another.

Further, on June 10, 2011, MANGUM fraudulently filed a pro se Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition in the Eastern District of North Carolina, in the name of another.  The debt counseling statement was fraudulently filed under the penalty of perjury by MANGUM.

MANGUM appeared at a Rule 2004 Examination in February, 2012, during which time he admitted to the fraudulent filings, and admitted to making misleading statements.

On June 12, 2012, the Bankruptcy Court entered an order directing that the two fraudulently filed cases be dismissed ab initio and directed that the records be expunged other than as necessary for further investigation. MANGUM was barred from filing bankruptcy for ten years and was permanently enjoined from assisting another individual with bankruptcy filings.  Lastly, as a sanction, MANGUM was ordered to pay $2,500 to the United States Bankruptcy Court within five months.

Investigation of this case was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  Assistant United States Attorney S. Katherine Burnette prosecuted the case for the government.

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Source: http://www.justice.gov/usao/nce/press/2014/2014-nov-18_02.html

image012RALEIGH, N.C. – Campbell Law Dean J. Rich Leonard announced today that David F. Mills has been tapped to lead the Stubbs Bankruptcy Clinic effective December 1. Mills, a 1991 Campbell Law graduate, recently completed a five-year stint as county attorney for Johnston County, North Carolina. He will continue his private bankruptcy practice in addition to his duties at Campbell Law.

“It is an honor to come home to Campbell Law,” said Mills. “I am personally excited to be charged with directing a clinic that bears the name of an attorney I have admired and enjoyed knowing for many years.

“I appreciate the confidence shown by Dean Leonard and the hiring committee. I will do all I can to make the clinic a positive part of the community, profession and Campbell Law.”

Named after prominent North Carolina bankruptcy and civil litigation attorney Trawick H. “Buzzy” Stubbs, Jr., the Stubbs Bankruptcy Clinic will begin operation with the spring 2015 semester. The clinic will receive referrals from the U.S. Bankruptcy Court and Legal Aid of North Carolina, and will be hosted within the U.S. Bankruptcy Court at the historic Century Station Federal Building on Fayetteville Street in Raleigh.

“David is the ideal person to build the Stubbs Bankruptcy Clinic from the ground up,” said Leonard. “His professional experience, coupled with his service as a leader in numerous professional and community organizations, positions him perfectly to help mold our students and provide them with a unique learning experience in bankruptcy law.”

A native of Trenton in eastern North Carolina, Mills is a Double Camel, having also received his undergraduate degree from Campbell University. Upon graduation from Campbell Law, he began his legal career in Johnston County becoming partner at Mast, Schulz, Mast, Mills, Johnson & Wells, P.A., in Smithfield, North Carolina.

Mills opened his own practice in January 2007 representing individuals and businesses before the Bankruptcy Court.  He is a leading attorney in the field of farm bankruptcy and reorganization. A member of the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys, Mills frequently speaks to other attorneys and groups regarding bankruptcy rights and practices.

Mills has held leadership roles in numerous professional organizations throughout his career, and currently sits on the North Carolina Bar Association (NCBA) Board of Governors. He formerly chaired the NCBA’s Law Practice Management Section and served on the NCBA’s Professionalism Committee. He has also served on the North Carolina Advocates for Justice’s Legislative Affairs Committee.

Outside of the legal profession, Mills has consistently championed community service. He is currently Chair of the Johnston-UNC Health Foundation.  He has also chaired the Trustees Committee of Centenary United Methodist Church and was Vice-Chair of the church’s Finance Committee.  Mills has served on the Boards of Directors of the Johnston County Tourism Authority and the Downtown Smithfield Development Corporation.  He has also served as Chairman of the Board for the Greater Smithfield-Selma Area Chamber of Commerce.

ABOUT CAMPBELL LAW:

Since its founding in 1976, Campbell Law School has developed lawyers who possess moral conviction, social compassion and professional competence, and who view the law as a calling to serve others. The school has been recognized by the American Bar Association (ABA) as having the nation’s top Professionalism Program and by the American Academy of Trial Lawyers for having the nation’s best Trial Advocacy Program. Campbell Law boasts more than 3,650 alumni, including more than 2,500 who reside and work in North Carolina. In September 2009, Campbell Law relocated to a state-of-the-art building in downtown Raleigh. For more information, visit http://law.campbell.edu.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK:
http://www.facebook.com/campbelllawschool

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM:
http://www.instagram.com/campbell_law

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Source: http://law.campbell.edu/news_article.cfm?id=42663&t=mills-to-lead-stubbs-bankruptcy-clinic

If you have been reading about filing bankruptcy lately, you have probably read a lot about “no money down” bankruptcies, promising to get you the help you need at no cost. It sounds great, but before you commit, you need to make sure you understand what you are getting into, and exactly what you are getting.

These advertisements are referring to Chapter 13 wage earner plans. In a Chapter 13, the debtor (the person filing bankruptcy) makes monthly payments in order to repay some or all of his or her debt. If the debtor has higher income or needs to stop a home foreclosure, a Chapter 13 is the way to go. These payment plans usually go on for 3 to 5 years.

However, in many situations, a Chapter 7 case will stop your creditors from trying to collect from you and provide you with a discharge, or forgiveness of your debt, in a much shorter time (4 months or so) without having to make any monthly payments at all or give up any assets. It’s true that all attorney fees in Chapter 7 must be paid up front. This is because any debt owed when the case is filed will be wiped out—including attorney fees. But, those fees are generally less than half the attorney fees that you will have to pay in a Chapter 13 case. That’s right—“no money down” doesn’t mean “no cost.” It just means they are paid over time. Generally, Chapter 13 attorney fees are more than double Chapter 7 fees and include an added commission that is paid to the Chapter 13 Trustee—just like paying interest. Paying for things with interest over time is often the cause of financial trouble in the first place!

So, if you pay a $3,700 attorney fee through your Chapter 13 plan (which is standard), with the commission you will pay a total of almost $4,000 in attorney fees, compared to $1,200 to $1,600 in most Chapter 7 cases.

When considering a “no money down” bankruptcy case, ask the lawyer these questions:

  1. Do I qualify for Chapter 7?
  2. Would Chapter 7 get me the help I need?
  3. How much does Chapter 7 cost?
  4. How much does Chapter 13 cost?
  5. Do I have to file Chapter 13?
  6. Why are you recommending Chapter 13?
  7. How long will I be in Chapter 13? How long would I be in Chapter 7?
  8. Are you recommending Chapter 13 so that you can charge a higher fee?

There is often a very good reason to file Chapter 13. Just make sure you ask the right questions, that you know exactly what you are getting into, and that you are acting in YOUR best interest.


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